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Top Picks
Collection of 17 images and products
gallery gallery
Caricatures
Collection of 143 images and products
gallery gallery
Extreme Weather
Collection of 3 images and products
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gallery gallery
Marine Life
Collection of 28 images and products
gallery gallery
Scientists
Collection of 60 images and products
Einstein and Eddington, 1930
Einstein and Eddington, 1930
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
1919 solar eclipse
1919 solar eclipse
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1919 solar eclipse
1919 solar eclipse
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Yuri Gagarin in capsule
Yuri Gagarin in capsule
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Salvinia Effect of Salvinia natans
Salvinia Effect of Salvinia natans
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Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Salvinia Effect of Salvinia natans Featured Image

Salvinia Effect of Salvinia natans

Scanning electron micrograph of leaf detail of Salvinia natans, a floating fern type plant which has superhydrophobic trichomes or hairs on the upper surface of its leaves. Each of these eggbeater shaped hairs exhibits a hydrophilic tip on the top of each hydrophobic hair. The combination of a hydrophobic surface with hydrophilic tips is called the "Salvinia Effect". These air retaining surfaces are of great interest, particularly with regards to fuel consumption when applied to ships having to overcome friction produced by the drag of water on their hulls. This drag could be reduced dramatically with the "Salvinia Effect", a layer of air between the ship's hull and the water, saving vast amounts of fuel. A suggested estimated saving of 20 million tons of oil per year for just a 10% decrease in drag for shipping alone. Magnification: x372 (x122 at 10cm wide)

© POWER AND SYRED/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
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Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
George Calver, English instrument maker
George Calver, English instrument maker
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Andrew Ainslie Common, British Astronomer
Andrew Ainslie Common, British Astronomer
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Ocean currents off the Americas
Ocean currents off the Americas
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Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico Featured Image

Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico

^BCave of Crystals.^b Geologist standing in the Cave of Crystals (^ICueva de los Cristales^i) in Naica Mine, Chihuahua, Mexico. The crystals are the largest known in the world, and are formed of the selenite form of gypsum (calcium sulphate). They formed over millions of years in the mineral-rich geothermally heated water that filled the caves. The crystals were discovered after the water was pumped out of the mine. The Cave of Crystals is 290 metres deep, and was discovered in 2000. Above it, 120 metres deep, is the Cave of Swords (^ICueva^i ^Ide^i ^Ilas Espadas^i), which was discovered in 1912. The crystals in this cave are smaller as its water cooled more rapidly

© JAVIER TRUEBA/MSF/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

The Sceptical Chymist (1661)
The Sceptical Chymist (1661)
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Teeth anatomy, illustration
Teeth anatomy, illustration
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Flame tests
Flame tests
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Daltons table of Atomic symbols, 1835
Daltons table of Atomic symbols, 1835
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School of barracuda
School of barracuda
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Beer drinkers, 19th Century illustration
Beer drinkers, 19th Century illustration
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Indri
Indri
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Observing the Universe, conceptual image
Observing the Universe, conceptual image
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Seagull Nebula, composite image
Seagull Nebula, composite image
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EDTA crystals, light micrograph
EDTA crystals, light micrograph
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Karbala, Iraq
Karbala, Iraq
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PLM of crystals of testosterone
PLM of crystals of testosterone
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The Sceptical Chymist (1661) Featured Image

The Sceptical Chymist (1661)

The Sceptical Chymist (1661). This title page is from the first edition of this work by the Anglo-Irish natural philosopher Robert Boyle (1627-1691). In this book, written in the form of a discourse (dialogue), Boyle wrote that elements combine to form compounds, which can be broken apart again into their constituent elements. He also argued for chemistry to become an experimental science in its own right, speaking out against the influence of alchemists and spagyrists (alchemists who used herbal medicines). This work is considered a founding text of modern chemistry. It was first published in English, and later translated into Latin

© GREGORY TOBIAS/CHEMICAL HERITAGE FOUNDATION/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Supersonic shock waves, Schlieren image
Supersonic shock waves, Schlieren image
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Octopus, 19th Century illustration
Octopus, 19th Century illustration
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Sweet chestnut, 19th century illustration
Sweet chestnut, 19th century illustration
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Native silver
Native silver
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Yuri Gagarin driving through London, UK
Yuri Gagarin driving through London, UK
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Three nose types, 17th century
Three nose types, 17th century
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South American camelid, 17th century
South American camelid, 17th century
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Hen, historical artwork
Hen, historical artwork
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Clouds, historical artwork
Clouds, historical artwork
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Normal childs head, X-ray
Normal childs head, X-ray
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Eroded arch called Marsden Rock
Eroded arch called Marsden Rock
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Tracks of the Curiosity rover on Mars. View looking back at a dune that NASA's
Tracks of the Curiosity rover on Mars. View looking back at a dune that NASA's
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